Our programming takes place on the ancestral homelands of the Coast Salish Peoples, who have lived in the Salish Sea basin, throughout the San Juan Islands and the North Cascades watershed, from time immemorial. We express our deepest respect and gratitude for our indigenous neighbors, particularly the Lummi Nation and Nooksack Tribe, for their enduring care and protection of our shared lands and waterways.

(For more information: WWU Tribal Relations)

Thank you to the organizations that have empowered and continue to support this collaborative effort including (alphabetically) Children of the Setting Sun Productions, Eastern Washington University, Friends of the San Juans, Galiano Conservancy Association, Geneva Elementary School, Northwest Indian College, Opportunity Council, University of Puget Sound, WWU Center for Community Learning, WWU Salish Sea Institute, WWU Sustainable Communities Partnership, Whatcom Community College, Whatcom County Library System, and Whiteswan Environmental.

 

Many additional organizations have provided meeting space, expertise, and communication support. Thank you all.

©2019 Community Engagement Fellows

The primary incentives for participation in the Fellows are:

 

(1) an inviting atmosphere,

 

(2) genuine and thoughtful discussion about important issues,

 

(3) individual and group support for ongoing and emerging campus-community collaborations,

 

(4) an expanded professional and community network, and

 

(5) free coffee/tea and snacks.  

 

Some of the organizations that employ Fellows also provide additional incentives, such as:

  • A modest stipend (~$500)

  • Credit toward a future "step" increase in pay

  • Hourly wages

  • Credit toward required continuing education hours

 

We feel a bit uncomfortable that some Fellows receive additional incentives for participation while others don’t. It feels unfair, but also like an unavoidable reality for a program that involves people with very different professional expectations and requirements.

 

Our principles and practices for incentivizing participation include:

 

Focus on the incentives you can offer everyone equally.

 

The five primary incentives listed above are the most important. Try to provide these consistently.

 

Don’t obsess over money.

 

The recruits who have inquired eagerly about monetary incentives seem to either drop out or not even sign up. Those that stick with the program see the many values in the process and enjoy the primary incentives, and don’t seem focused on monetary incentives.

 

Talk with Fellows about their organization’s professional development structures.

 

Encourage Fellows to consider and articulate to their organization’s leadership how the program fits in to their systems.

 

Help the program “count” in new ways.

 

For example, we applied for the Fellows to be an official “Faculty Education Workshop” for Whatcom Community College employees in 2017-2018, which meant they would now get paid to participate. We’re working toward having Fellows program count as continuing education “clock hours” for K-12 staff in Washington starting in 2018-2019.

Participation Incentives

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Campus Community Coalition leader Julia Burns designed an annual "Do Good in Your Neighborhood" Day that brings together students and longer-term residents. 

“You could be part of the CE Fellows endlessly and it would be a valuable experience every time. Each session provides a wealth of inspiration, new contacts and collaboration opportunities.”

- Julia Burns

During a cohort meeting on a blustery, rainy day, a Fellow admitted that he wasn't sure that morning that he was up for biking downtown for our meeting. Then he shared, "But, I knew that there'd be hot coffee, so I came." Little comforts go a long way. 

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